As a child of immigrants displaced within a war-torn country, their deprivation of educational opportunities has made me value the prospect’s education may bring. There is an absence of social class equality within Somalia, encouraging me to generate solutions to bring educational opportunities to the poorest. As a country plagued with epidemics of female genital mutilation and child marriages, education has become a route to spread awareness within children about their fundamental rights. Residing within the patriarchal boundaries of Somali society, I have been intrigued by social interactions regarding class and gender, where I have seen key sociological concepts play out right before my own eyes. The injustices that I have witnessed motivates me to secure basic human rights and equalities for everyone in my home country, particularly for those who are vulnerable and exploited.Studying Sociology has developed my knowledge of the inequalities that are prevalent across different cultures and societies. For instance, I have discovered that students from private schools achieve a better standard of education than those in public schools and thus, end up with a better career. In Somalia, like many countries plagued by war, opportunities are favouring those from affluent backgrounds, who can afford to pay for exclusive resources such as private education. Based on these observations, I agree with many ideas presented by Karl Marx’s in The Communist Manifesto; one being that meritocracy is a myth if working-class pupils are not able to access the same opportunities than those of their middle-class peers. Furthermore, Business Studies has taught me about capital and how the economy is at the root of most national decisions and cultural norms. Through studying business, I have also learnt about the different economies across the world, and the comparison in living standards between developed and developing countries. Academically, Business has also helped me gain to strong communication skills (oral and written), analysis, critical thinking, problem-solving and decision making. Finally, IT has helped me to develop my own resilience of meeting deadlines and pushing myself to work hard in the face of adversity. Last summer I took part in the London School of Economics and Political Science summer school (LSE Choice), of which the selection process was extremely competitive. This involved studying Sociology intensively over the summer period, and I currently still attend every Saturday. Taking part in this course has helped me to see sociology beyond the classroom and textbook and understand how the concepts work in society. This course has developed my independent learning skills and has provided me with an insight as to what university will offer me. Additionally, partaking in the Duke of Edinburgh scheme last year has been beneficial for developing my intra and interpersonal skills. Participating furthered my communication skills and confidence amongst large groups. This once in a lifetime opportunity showed me the leadership skills I possessed that could not be projected in school. Furthermore, I am currently a Year 11 Sociology mentor which involves giving guidance to students regarding GCSE content and exam technique. This furthers my own understanding by having to support others in their learning, and has inspired me to teach Sociology at a later point in life. Finally, being a Restorative Justice practitioner at my school required me to mediate difficult situations both between students and between staff and students. This allowed me to practise active listening and conflict resolution. Overall, I believe the skills and experience I have gained have given me a realistic perspective on what university life entails, and I am fully motivated to put these skills and knowledge into practice and fully immerse myself into the institution.