Last updated: July 11, 2019
Topic: ArtPoetry
Sample donated:

Installation artists require an interactive atmosphere to effectively utilise and express their art works to their audience. Over the years, in the art world, choice of materials, site specificity and audience experience have become paramount considerations for installation artists to gain the correct response from viewers. Artists such as Janet Lawrence, Kurt Schwitters, Andy Goldsworthy use such mechanisms which in turn make their works so well recognised. Janet Lawrence is an artist who demonstrates that choices of materials, site and audience experience contribute to the recognition and appeal of an artwork.

WAITING – A Medicinal Garden for Ailing Plants (2010) was Lawrence’s piece for 2010 Sydney Biennale. Lawrence’s practice often involves the scrutiny of natural and built environments. Therefore, Janet Lawrence utilises site specificity to explore themes of “nature, science, history, transformation and memory”. Lawrence’s Biennale piece parallels the theme of a medicinal garden . Within this piece she aims to promote recognition of endangered environments. The heading itself presents a sense of irony.

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A “medicinal garden” for “ailing plants” this emphasises that the site itself is significant to the cause outlining the importance of materials chosen- in this case the natural plant life. The mirrored stainless Steele and glass gives a real life effect to the piece symbolising the importance of the message Lawrence is aiming to promote. The structure is built in the form of a sanatorium with glasshouses often found in botanic gardens. In deeper investigation, it can be seen Lawrence has constructed a recovery refuge for delicate and rare plant life.

Ultimately, it can be seen that Janet Lawrence’s WAITING – A Medicinal Garden for Ailing Plants (2010) expresses the urgency of saving the environment in a unique and serious means by employing the skills of her practice as an installation artist. The contributing factors such as choice of materials, site specificity and audience experience expose the important consideration for this artist. Kurt Schwitters was born 20 June 1887 – 8 January 1948, he was a German painter who was born in Hanover, Germany.

His artistic practice was painting, collage artist’s book, installation, sculpture, poetry and performance. Kurt Schwitters reference to the work of his installation. “The Merzbau” the transformation of six or possibly more rooms of the family house in Hannover, Waldhausenstrasse 5. This took place very gradually; work started in about 1923, the first room was finished in 1933, and Schwitters subsequently extended the Merzbau to other areas of the house until he fled to Norway in early 1937. Most of the house was let to tenants, so that the final extent of the Merzbau was less than is normally assumed.

On the evidence of Schwitters’ correspondence, by 1937 it had spread to two rooms of his parents’ apartment on ground floor, the adjoining balcony, the space below the balcony, one or two rooms of the attic and possibly part of the cellar. In 1943 it was destroyed in a bombing raid. Early photos show the Merzbau with a grotto-like surface and various columns and sculptures, possibly referring to similar pieces by Dadaists, including the Great Plasto-Dio-Dada-Drama by Johannes Baader, shown at the first International Dada Fair, Berlin, 1920.

Work by Hannah Hoch, Raoul Hausmann and Sophie Tauber, amongst others, were incorporated into the fabric of the installation. By 1933, it had been transformed into a sculptural environment, and three photos from this year show a series of angled surfaces aggressively protruding into a room painted largely in white, with a series of Tableaux spread across the surfaces. In his essay ‘Ich und meine Ziele’ in Merz 21, Schwitters referred to the first column of his work as the Cathedral of Erotic Misery.

There is no evidence that he used this name after 1930, however. The first use of the word ‘Merzbau’ occurs in 1933. Andy Goldsworthy born 26 July 1956. Is a British sculptor, photographer and environmentalist living in Scotland who produces site-specific sculpture and land art situated in natural and urban settings. His art involves the use of natural and found objects, to create both temporary and permanent sculptures which draw out the character of their environment.

Andy Goldsworthy reference to the work of his installation “Faultline”. It is one of the few permanent installations of an Andy Goldsworthy creation that can be found at the entrance to the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco. Starting from a small crack just outside the courtyard, the split grows in thickness, and then meanders into the entryway, moving back and forth, as well as passing through several large chunks of rock before leading to the doors of the museum.

Andy Goldsworthy spent three months at the Museum during its renovation, hand-cracking the slate tiles to get just the effect he wanted. The large rocks are hewn from a quarry near his home in Scotland, creating further bonds between the artist and the art. The natural drill holes and marks created by cutting and moving the large slabs have all been left in place, unchanged. In conclusion installation is art that describes an artistic genre of site-specific, three-dimensional works designed to transform the perception of a space.

Generally, the term is applied to interior spaces, whereas exterior interventions are often called Land art; however the boundaries between these terms overlap. Installation art can be either temporary or permanent. Installation artworks have been constructed in exhibition spaces such as museums and galleries, as well as public and private spaces. All three artists Janet Laurence, Kurt Schwitters and Andy Goldsworthy all use installation in there artworks which is a three dimensional work designed to transform the perception of space.

All of which artists have expressed in their artwork. All of these three artists describe what and how, they used the equipment to make these artworks with using the method of installation three dimensional works. In conclusion, Installation artists require an interactive atmosphere to effectively utilise and express their art works to their audience. Over the years, in the art world, choice of materials, site specificity and audience experience have become paramount considerations for installation artists to gain the correct response from viewers.