Last updated: September 19, 2019
Topic: ArtBooks
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Internal Communication Dilemmas

After winning back-to-back championships, all could have been too well for the Los Angeles Lakers as they were able to sweep three finals championships during the 2000, 2001 and 2002 NBA Seasons The NBA Season for 2000 marked a new beginning for the Lakers as they hired Phil Jackson as the head of the crew while taking along with him three assistant coaches in the persons of Jim Cleamons (a former player on the Lakers 1971-72 squad), Frank Hamblen and Tex Winter, and along with holdover Bill Bertka. The coaching arsenal of the Los Angeles Lakers during that season proved to be one of the most experienced lineups in the NBA (Lace).

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The Lakers then proved at the onset of the 2000 Season that they had not only the backing of an experienced coaching staff but also a frontal assault team led with no less than Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal. At the end of the stretch of the regular season as well as the finals, the Lakers came out strong, eventually finishing the year with the championship crown (Association).

For three consecutive championship crowns added to the halls of the Staples Center, the Lakers proved to be a cunning team among the other teams in the NBA partly because of the team effort and mostly because of the fierce tandem of two of the leagues best players and of one of the leagues most experienced and most feathered coach. It appeared that there was simply no stopping the rampage of the Los Angeles Lakers as

they opted for yet another crown during the 2003 NBA Season (Lazenby).

However, even if they were a strand closer to bagging a fourth consecutive championship crown, their crusade fell short as the San Antonio Spurs took away such possibility. Even if the efforts were altogether combined from among the team and the coaching staff the Lakers eventually lost the chance of bagging another NBA title to their belts (Kalb).

Shaquille O’Neal suffered from a toe injury at the onset of the 2003 season, thus missing out the first twelve games. Unable to contribute on the hard court as he usually does as a part of his central task, O’Neal by the end of November the same year was O’Neal able to rejoin the group and make his presence felt within the remaining games left to be played. While Shaq himself was unable to continue his offensive onslaught at the start of the season, Kobe Bryant assumed the team’s leading scoring role (Savage). He had to step-up. As a result, he was able to win several recognitions for his monumental presence in both the offensive and defensive arsenal of the Lakers alongside with the rest of his teammates.

By the end of November, O’Neal was able to enter the roster back from a fresh injury and regain his composure in the team’s offense. After closing-in on the few remaining games just before the end of the season, the Lakers were more than able to ascend back to what was once their position, still able to best other teams while the danger of losing-out during the onset of the season proved to be fatal to the team.

The next season marked another milestone for the Lakers franchise albeit the decisive loss for the championship shot. Gary Payton and Karl Malone, both key figures in their respective teams before changing ships, have been contracted to join the elite force of the Los Angeles Lakers. Edging the court with O’Neal and Bryant were Malone and Payton, an all-star line-up that at first seemed flawless and fits the perfect formula for winning the championship crown that they lost in the previous season. However, Malone was out for the next thirty-nine games as he suffered from a sprained right knee. Still determined to pursue their offensive onslaught, the Lakers kept pushing through the games left before and after the all-star break. Again, they lost the crown to the Detroit Pistons. The loss was quite a fact to swallow for the reason that the lustrous line-up of the Lakers was almost a sure ticket for the 2004 championship crown. Almost, that is. The fact was that the Pistons were far less lustrous with their line-up at least in terms of popularity and experience of the ace players as compared to the Lakers. This crucial part spelled the start of the end of the Lakers’ NBA legacy (Heisler).

It was a hard fact for the Lakers to swallow what seemed to be a bitter pill which they sought as the cure for the previous dismay they experienced from failing to win a fourth consecutive crown. The luster of Malone and Payton along with Bryant and O’Neal through the hard court guidance of Jackson proved to be a turning point for the entire team. As with the abundance of first-class talent that fill the major spots in the lineup, the fate of the Lakers at the end of the season have proven the expression that too many cooks spoil the broth. It is not the case that for one soup to taste its best it should contain all the best ingredients regardless of the price. Rather, for a soup to be able to still stand-out from the rest there should be a balance among the ingredients. The components of each and every basketball team ought not to be comprised entirely of coaches or highly-paid all-star basketball players. Quite on the other hand, the very sustenance of the team very well rests on the capacity of the team to adjust components in accordance to the genuine pursuit of what best favors them

The Lakers during the 2004 NBA Season was beaming with an array of superstars. True enough they were able to surmount the rest of the teams in the league using their aces. Nevertheless, the season finals became the ultimate test for the entire team as they once again lost the chance of bagging the crown this time before the Detroit Pistons.

The crucial aspect of such a consecutive loss for a promising team such as the Lakers rests on the management of the team itself. Since the management of the Lakers opted to acquire the service of yet another two superstars, the apparent consequence is that even with the guidance of a well-experienced coach the players had to level down their personal expectations. The fact that Payton and Malone came from teams with a strong record for NBA finals appearances brings forth an attitude whereby they expect a an equally significant role or one which may be higher in terms of the quality minutes they play on court. The very presence of both Bryant and O’Neal in the team’s roster, notwithstanding the direction of the seasoned Phil Jackson, already signifies the fact that the Lakers is already a star-quality team in its own right. Add to that yet another two superstars and the result will be that of a team rattled from the inside with sheer confusion about “who-does-what during games (Laker).

Thus, the tag of an ­all-star team for the Los Angeles Lakers did not eventually pay-off. Quite on the contrary, the very strength of the individual players when summed up became the weakness of the entire team.

For several crucial reasons, the Los Angeles Lakers ought to trim down on the number of lustrous players they have in their roster. First, because having too many cooks will eventually spoil the broth, only a minimum number of ace players are needed in order to sustain the momentum of the entire team. Too many lead roles distort the entire goal of the team because the focus of the team becomes centered on the individual performance of the players whereby the status of the team as a whole, though such may not necessarily be the case, is compromised.

Second, since the all-star lineup of the Lakers proved to be fatal, it reflects the inadequacy of the wisdom from the management for the reason that it is the team management that gets to decide who will play for the team throughout the season. The team management should resort back to the original formula of just having a pair of working ace players enough to fuel the entire team onto full throttle throughout the season.

Lastly, it would be quite impractical for the team management to invest in lineup beaming with superstar players because even though the very status of the players may reflect the image being conceived on the whole team it does not, however, bring assurance regarding the fate of the team at the end of the season.

In general, the Los Angeles Lakers could have had two more consecutive sweeps right after their championship crowns for the last three seasons only if they had opted to stick with the team’s original formula and disregarded the option of having a confused lineup in terms of who gets to score and who gets to defend.

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From Triumph to Failure Diagram

Los Angeles Lakers bags three consecutive championships from 2000 to 2002 with a roster headed by Phil Jackson, Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant.

The Lakers acquires the service of former Utah Jazz ace player Karl Malone and former Seattle Supersonic’s defensive guard Gary Payton during the 2004 NBA season

The Lakers loses to the Detroit Pistons in the NBA finals

A suggestion is that the Lakers tone down the lustrous lineup they had for the past season and concentrate on the untapped resources that lay almost every game in the bench of the team.

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Figure 1. A brief diagram of the rise and decline of the Los Angeles Lakers in terms of team handling

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Works Cited

Association, National Basketball. The Big Title Champion Los Angeles Lakers: The Official Nba Finals 2000 Retrospective 1st ed ed: Broadway, 2000.

Heisler, Mark. Madmen’s Ball: The inside Story of the Lakers’ Dysfunctional Dynasties. Chicago: Triumph Books, 2004.

Kalb, Elliott. Who’s Better, Who’s Best in Basketball?: Mr Stats Sets the Record Straight on the Top 50 Nba Players of All Time 1ed: McGraw-Hill1, 2003.

Lace, William W. The Los Angeles Lakers Basketball Team. New Jersey: Enslow Publishers, 2000.

Laker, Anthony. Sociology of Sport and Physical Education: An Introduction. New York: RoutledgeFalmer, 2001.

Lazenby, Roland. The Show: The inside Story of the Spectacular Los Angeles Lakers in the Words of Those Who Lived It. 1 ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005.

Savage, Jeff. Kobe Bryant: Basketball Big Shot. Lerner Sports, 2001.

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