Last updated: February 14, 2019
Topic: EducationSchool
Sample donated:

Podsnappery And The Veneers In? Our Common Friend? Essay, Research Paper

`Quotations. 1 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Mr and Mrs

Veneering were brand-new people in a brand-new house in a brand-new one-fourth of

London. ? Everything about the Veneers

was immaculate and span new? the surface smelt a small excessively much of the workshop and

was a trifle stickey. ? ( P.48 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? The

parvenu category in London are epitomised by the Veneering household. ? Dickens shows his ain perceptual experience of this new

category jumping up within the metropolis with his less than favorable descriptions

of the Veneerings. In this introductory transition, Dickens clearly shows that in

order to try to suit in with the society with which they now associated, the

Veneers had brought a batch of brassy, showy, ? bran-new? furniture, and their

whole lives revolve around seting on an act for the remainder of the universe that is

merely merely a veneer. ? As the name

suggests, the Veneers are shallow, hollow people who use the acquired wealths

to cover over all their ain shortcomings.2 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? There is

exhilaration in the Veneering sign of the zodiac? in order that tomorrow? s banquet may be

crowned with flowers. ? ( P.159 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? The

Veneers are clearly meaning to heighten their place in society by this

gesture. ? Their utmost generousness in

puting on the nuptials for two of their familiarities does non come out of

kindness, but out of their wish to demo those around them how affluent they

are. ? The result of the nuptials besides

shows that Veneering is non the most sharp of characters as he fails to

recognise that both Alfred and Sophroniaan have deceived him as respects to

their fiscal situations. ? The whole

image of Veneering puting on a big nuptials for two about aliens merely

adds to the feeling of Veneering being a shoal character merely concerned with

progressing his ain state of affairs by agencies of demoing himself to be a rich blue blood

with money to burn.3 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Mr Podsnap

was good to make and stood really extremely in Mr Podsnap? s sentiment? and he felt

witting that he set a superb societal illustration in being peculiarly good

satisfied with most things, and, above all other things, with himself? ( P.174 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? This

opening few lines of the chapter entitled? Podsnappery? give us as readers a

peculiarly good penetration into the individual of Mr Podsnap. Throughout the narrative

he is the object of Dickens? distain. ?

He thinks himself to be better than all of those around him. ? He enjoys being in society, but merely in

order to convey himself into the spotlight, demo off his wealth and farther

progress his ain place as a wealthy, good to make gentleman. ? He uses people merely in order to heighten

his ain self-importance and do him experience better about himself. ? He is grandiloquent, chesty and full of self-importance. ? This is the type of character Dickens?

efforts to portray as a typical upper category gentleman. The transition continues

demoing Podsnap? s reluctance to cover with hard jobs, his disfavor for

aliens, his regular being traveling from twenty-four hours to twenty-four hours in a set form

( ? acquiring up at eight, shaving close to one-fourth yesteryear, breakfasting at nine,

traveling to the City at 10s, coming place at half-past five, and dining at seven. ? )

and his involuntariness to look outside of his ain being, shows what a

shoal, meaningless being he leads and how blissfully incognizant of this fact

he is.4 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? These may

be said to be the articles of religion and school which the present chapter takes

the autonomy of naming, after its representative adult male, Podsnappery? and they were

enunciated with a sounding gaudery that smacked the creaking of Mr Podsnap? s ain

boots. ? ( P.175 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? It is clear

through this citation that Dickens realises that the stereotype to which he

refers in Mr. Podsnap is non merely confined to few and far between, but in his

description of Podsnap, Dickens refers to a category of people, and is doing a

profound statement about the lives they lead. ?

His profound unfavorable judgment of their being is the deficiency of significance in it ;

he thinks them grandiloquent, conceited and wholly self-orientated, obsessed by

place and power.5 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? The

bulk of the invitees were like the home base, and included several heavy articles

weighing of all time so much. ? ( P.177 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Showing the

indulgence of the rich society, and the desire to demo off what they have.6 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? But there

was a foreign Gentleman among them? which one would seek in vain among the

States of the Earth. ? ( P.179-181 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Podsnap

here shows his profound belief that he is superior to everybody else in every

manner despite grounds to the reverse. ?

His wide and sweeping statements are based on no grounds except his

ain strong beliefs, and by handling the Frenchman as inferior to himself he shows his

belief that Thursday

vitamin E English and peculiarly himself are better than all aliens

no affair who they are. ? His beliefs,

although sincere, are entirely baseless and his pretension at superior

intelligence is no more than that. ? He

shows himself in this transition to be conceited, chesty, full of

ego, ailment educated and irrational.7 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Britannia,

sitting chew overing one all right twenty-four hours? but he says he will give Veneering four hours. ?

( P.295 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? This

transition shows Dickens? illustration of the corruptness both within parliament

and within the upper categories at time.8 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Veneering

so says to Mrs. Veneering, ? We must work, ? ? I am non strong plenty to bear

him. ? ( P.295-306 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? This

transition is concerned with Veneering going an M.P. ? Although he is offered the occupation on a home base through graft, he

insists upon hotfooting around inquiring his? friends? to garner unit of ammunition him. This

although it is entirely unneeded gives the visual aspect of him making something

that he considers? work? . ? It is clear

that Veneering has ne’er truly? worked? and has led a life of luxury. ? He is besides stupid, as he has been

given the occupation anyhow via the payoff, the twenty-four hours spent hotfooting to see his friends is

rather unneeded. However, it does function the intent of heightening Veneers?

place in society by denoting his freshly acquired place to all in

society.9 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Now I shall

be plain with you, Veneering, ? Then I? ll work for you. ? ( P.299 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Podsnap

shows merely how superior he considers himself to be by his insisting that he

would be in parliament if he chose to be so. ?

It appears that he has to be one better than anybody else who succeeds

in order to maintain his self-importance at its current over-inflated degree. His unashamed

belief that he is superior to Veneering in every manner is shown by his attitude

towards Veneering? s petition and his condescending attitude to his? friend?

shows his evident neglect for everything outside of himself.10 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Veneering,

M.P. , ? the vanished individual has been spirited off or otherwise harmed. ? ( P.472 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? This

infusion shows that already Veneering is get downing to set on the poses and graces

of a M.P. when it is rather unneeded to make so. ? He is utilizing his place to progress his reputability and

place in society so that he can experience superior to all those around him.11 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? But, cipher

is half so much surprised as Hamilton Veneering, Esquire, M.P? .a inquiring

dinner? ( P.683 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Equally shortly as

the Lammles lose their? money? and reputability through their place in

society, they are immediately disregarded as friends or familiarities ; the whole

of society deems them to be outcast from their old topographic point among them. ? This is the volatile nature of the Veneers,

the Podsnaps and Al of their closest contacts that they will non accept anybody

as a friend who lacks money, power or position. ? Their friends hence are non truly friends but objects for

selfish goals. ? Veneering is peculiar

environments himself with the rich and powerful for his ain self-aggrandisement.12 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? I, Podsnap

casually comment elsewhere that I dined last Monday with a gorgeous train of

camels. ? ( P.684 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Podsnap

seizes an chance here to heighten his ain place in society through

stating others about his rich and of import connexions with which he dined

last Monday.13 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Veneering

pervades the legislative anterooms? brand-new faces overnight. ? ( P.683 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Veneering

is purpose on demoing his friends and acquaintances his newfound importance by

conveying other M.Ps to dine with him. ?

This is yet another effort by Veneering to expose his new powerful

place in society.14 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? The

Veneers have been, as usual, tirelessly covering dinner cards to society. ?

( P.886 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? The

Veneers deal out diner cards on a regular footing to give the feeling that

they have a immense luck and can afford to give big, munificent diner parties,

and thereby heighten their ain place in society, as the more money one

appears to hold, the more influential one is! 15 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Yes? and in a

absolutely private and confidential manner. ? ?

( P.887 ) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? The

Veneers through munificent outgo and desire for importance and influence

in society have over expended and lived beyond their means. ? In their desire for credence they lost

their money and through the volatile nature of their importance they have lost

all friends and familiarities one time their money has gone. ? This shows the entire deficiency of existent friendly relationship

within the upper-class society epitomised by the Veneers and the

Podsnaps. ? When Veneering loses his

money, society culls Veneering as does parliament, and all that Veneering had

worked for has gone along with his money. ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?