The
help is a wonderful tale written in an old fashioned style. The novel is soon
to be a Hollywood movie and the very fact surely tells much about its all
appealing perspectives.

The
story is written in two entirely different angles. The first perspective is
that of two black American maids who struggle to win their bread and butter.
Their hardships, dedication, the racial segregation they suffer etc. become me
the main area of explorations. One among the black maids is Aibleen who is
raising her “seventeenth white child” and the other is Minny who cannot fit
into any job due to her hot head.

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The
second angle is the counterpart perspective from a white lady, Miss Skeeter,
who aspires to be a writer. As the novel progresses she identifies herself and
only this part of the novel acquires a bildungsroman genre.

The
most striking feature of The Help is
that it has in itself the story of the author, Kathryn Stockett. The writer
herself was born in Jackson, Mississippi, where the novel also takes place. The
character Miss Skeeter is in a constant search for her maid and even Stockett
has told about a black maid who inspired her like anything.

As
the novel progresses the reader is restless to know the consequences of the
three leads’ decision. Both the decision and the consequences are equally
breathtaking. The novel, no doubt, can also be read in a feminist angle as the
plot and its development owes much to female characters only. Aibleen is a
woman who lives alone and Minny definitely survives her drunkard husband each
day. Even Miss Skeeter is no exception because she confidently leaves her
nagging and racist boyfriend to find a life of her own.

The
Help
is surely a nuanced variation on the theme of social segregation and racial
discrimination. Though it is her debut novel, nothing seems to evidence it.
There is attention to historical details, dialect and characterization. All
these make the novel lush, original and poignant. And the book is definitely a
glorious read.