Last updated: July 21, 2019
Topic: LawGovernment
Sample donated:

Two countries: Strategic Success or Failure

Strategic failures in Japan

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Japan having industrialized in the 20th century, it still lacked most of the raw materials thus getting strong competition from the United States of America.Initially,Japan enjoyed the relationship of trade between the USA and Japan like the petroleum was one important material that Japan really got from the USA. In later stages, the USA government revised their tariffs upwards. This really affected the operations of the Japanese leading to hardships hence shifted to militarization. By the end of 1931 the Japan government had already signed a contract with the Germany and the Italy.

Ten years later, Japan threatened and invaded India and Malaysia. This did not hit well in the US government and they decided to place some bottlenecks in the Japanese markets in East Asia. Though the relationship did not break down in a night, the effect stayed longer.[1] The Japan’s strategic failure was the fact of attacking a country it should never have attacked in the first place. The better option for the Japanese after attacking the US Pearl Harbor could be maybe to go for peace and reconciliation and not proceeding with the war that they lost at the end of it all. Was that peal harbor set by the US a trap to incite Japan for a war! Was it a deliberate plan? Then this should have been the most successful plan to the US as they attained a geopolitical chance with the Japan. Their failure was as a result of randomness and failure.

Strategic success in Prussia

Prussia after indulging in a battle with Ligny, their army decided to retreat bringing a defensive position with Wellingtons. Their battle was on river dyle that led to an imperial Guard facilitation.[2] At the end of the battle, the French emerged victorious. This can be seen as a strategic success to the Prussians as victory brought about by decisions was attributed at Waterloo. The 17000 troop that was rearguard by Prussian was an addition to the 33000 troop French that should have been involved at Waterloo.[3] This was an additional success. This success was as a result of planning and predictions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliography

 

Sigmund S. G. (1999) Strategic Assessment in war, Yale University Press
Swanepoel, E. (2009) Series of strategic failures brought US and Japan to war, Chuck annes

 

Wilden, A. (1987) Man and Woman, War and Peace: The strategist’s Companion, Routledge

[1] Sigmund S. G. (1999) Strategic Assessment in war, Yale University Press
[2] Swanepoel, E. (2009) Series of strategic failures brought US and Japan to war, Chuck annes
[3] Wilden, A. (1987) Man and Woman, War and Peace: The strategist’s Companion, Routledge