& # 8211 ; Confucius Essay, Research Paper

World Lit. I.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Wisdom

Confucius said: & # 8221 ; The knowing enjoy H2O, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent ; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived. & # 8221 ; ( 611 ) Water is critical to existence and is traveling streaming and fluxing off from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, nevertheless olympian, remain stationary everlastingly. To cognize and to cognize more 1 must travel and larn. Knowledge besides expands appetency for more cognition therefore the 1s who know, will diligently work to cognize more and to break the universe alternatively of softly accepting it. Happiness is measured in tallness, non in length ; it is straight related to the grade of personal fulfilment that one is able to make, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius & # 8217 ; averment is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha & # 8217 ; s & # 8220 ; Buddhacarita & # 8221 ; . In the transition the bright immature princess is kept shielded from all negative facets of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the castle, he realizes he had been kept from cognizing life itself. He becomes even more funny, relentless and willing to move alternatively of accepting, and, eventually, he sets out in hunt of felicity through religious enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momently and partly arrested, is impossible to restrict. Just like immature Shakyamuni, it can non be held confined, it can non be kept from traveling to topographic points. It will finally claim its infinite and demand its freedom:

The sovereign, reflecting that the prince must see nil untoward that might foment his head, assigned him a home in the upper floor of the castle and did non let him to entree the land. . . . The hearing of the capturing character of the metropolis Grovess, beloved of the womenfolk, he set his bosom on an expedition outside, like an elephant confined inside a house. ( 550 )

As H2O moves off from the mountains, the prince begins his journey that will finally take him off from the castle and impel him towards detecting the universe for himself.

With each jaunt his wonder grows and each clip be becomes more and more compelled to larn about the existent universe and to do a difference. The quotation mark provinces, & # 8220 ; The knowing are diligent ; the humane are quiet. & # 8221 ; ( 611 ) Prince Shakyamuni absolutely mirrors the passage between soundlessness and diligence as cognition about the existent universe penetrates his boundaries:

Then the prince returned to the same castle, but so lost in anxiousness that is seemed to him empty. But even there he found no alleviation, as he of all time dwelt on the topic of old age ; hence once more with the permission of the male monarch he went out? ( 553 )

Although the things he learns about the existent universe do non strike him positively, larning itself necessarily induces a craving to larn more, which, ironically adequate diminishes his apprehension of the universe:

Therefore, charioteer, allow our chariot be turned back ; for it is non the clip or topographic point for pleasure-resorts. For how could a adult male of intelligence be heedless here in the hr of catastrophe, when one time he knows of devastation? ( 554 )

Knowing and larning topographic point him in a province of pandemonium, and merely go forth him with more inquiries. He becomes dying and overwhelmed by the find of the existent universe. He finds the universe to be nescient, insensitive and displeasing, and he finds it impossible to believe it to be acceptable in its current province:

He, the supreme adult male, saw that they had no house picking in the existent truth, and with head that was at the same clip both perturbed and steadfast he therefore mediated: – & # 8216 ; ? what rational being would stand or sit or lie at easiness, still less laugh, when he knows of old age, disease and decease? . . . . he is merely like a being without ground, who, on seeing another aged or ill or even dead, remains apathetic and unaffected. For when one tree is sheared both of its flowers and its fruit and falls or is cut down, another tree in no hard-pressed thereby. & # 8217 ; . . . he felt no contentment, he obtained no alleviation, like a king of beasts pierced profoundly in the bosom by a poisoned pointer. ( 555 )

Contentment and quiet credence are the biggest obstruction to action. To make nil brings no felicity to anyone ; therefore anxiousness and heartache are indispensable in impeling the prince towards seeking personal fulfilment in this universe. Although he realizes that some facts of life are so inevitable, he remains unable to merely accept the universe as it is:

A deplorable thing it is so that, who is himself incapacitated and capable to the jurisprudence of old age, disease and devastation, should in his ignorance and the sightlessness of his amour propre, pay no attentiveness to another who is the victim of old age, disease or decease. For if I, who am myself such, should pay no attentiveness to another whose nature is every bit such, it would non be right or suiting in me, who have knowledge of this, the ultimate Torahs.

He can ne’er once more softly retreat to the undisturbed comfort, peace and luxury of the castle. In fact, his new experiences and penetration into world alteration his very definition of & # 8220 ; comfort & # 8221 ; and & # 8220 ; peace & # 8221 ; and he sets out to happen felicity through religious fulfilment and leaves the castle.

In conformity with Confucius & # 8217 ; statement, the prince, like H2O, could non be held and confined indefinitely. Once on the move, he kept traveling off from the castle, like the H2O with its watercourse irreversible. The more he knew, the more he wanted to cognize, and the lupus erythematosus he understood. His quest for cognition led him out of the soundlessness of the castle and his deep thrust to seek replies and alterations sent him off in chase of his felicity.

Judit Bodor

ENG. 2653

World Lit. I.

Wisdom

Confucius said: & # 8221 ; The knowing enjoy H2O, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent ; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived. & # 8221 ; ( 611 ) Water is critical to existence and is traveling streaming and fluxing off from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, nevertheless olympian, remain stationary everlastingly. To cognize and to cognize more 1 must travel and larn. Knowledge besides expands appetency for more cognition therefore the 1s who know, will diligently work to cognize more and to break the universe alternatively of softly accepting it. Happiness is measured in tallness, non in length ; it is straight related to the grade of personal fulfilment that one is able to make, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius & # 8217 ; averment is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha & # 8217 ; s & # 8220 ; Buddhacarita & # 8221 ; . In the transition the bright immature princess is kept shielded from all negative facets of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the castle, he realizes he had been kept from cognizing life itself. He becomes even more funny, relentless and willing to move alternatively of accepting, and, eventually, he sets out in hunt of felicity through religious enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momently and partly arrested, is impossible to restrict. Just like immature Shakyamuni, it can non be held confined, it can non be kept from traveling to topographic points. It will finally claim its infinite and demand its freedom:

The sovereign, reflecting that the prince must see nil untoward that might foment his head, assigned him a home in the upper floor of the castle and did non let him to entree the land. . . . The hearing of the capturing character of the metropolis Grovess, beloved of the womenfolk, he set his bosom on an expedition outside, like an elephant confined inside a house. ( 550 )

As H2O moves off from the mountains, the prince begins his journey that will finally take him off from the castle and impel him towards detecting the universe for himself.

With each jaunt his wonder grows and each clip be becomes more and more compelled to larn about the existent universe and to do a difference. The quotation mark provinces, & # 8220 ; The knowing are diligent ; the humane are quiet. & # 8221 ; ( 611 ) Prince Shakyamuni absolutely mirrors the passage between soundlessness and diligence as cognition about the existent universe penetrates his boundaries:

Then the prince returned to the same castle, but so lost in anxiousness that is seemed to him empty. But even there he found no alleviation, as he of all time dwelt on the topic of old age ; hence once more with the permission of the male monarch he went out? ( 553 )

Although the things he learns about the existent universe do non strike him positively, larning itself necessarily induces a craving to larn more, which, ironically adequate diminishes his apprehension of the universe:

Therefore, charioteer, allow our chariot be turned back ; for it is non the clip or topographic point for pleasure-resorts. For how could a adult male of intelligence be heedless here in the hr of catastrophe, when one time he knows of devastation? ( 554 )

Knowing and larning topographic point him in a province of pandemonium, and merely go forth him with more inquiries. He becomes dying and overwhelmed by the find of the existent universe. He finds the universe to be nescient, insensitive and displeasing, and he finds it impossible to believe it to be acceptable in its current province:

He, the supreme adult male, saw that they had no house picking in the existent truth, and with head that was at the same clip both perturbed and steadfast he therefore mediated: – & # 8216 ; ? what rational being would stand or sit or lie at easiness, still less laugh, when he knows of old age, disease and decease? . . . . he is merely like a being without ground, who, on seeing another aged or ill or even dead, remains apathetic and unaffected. For when one tree is sheared both of its flowers and its fruit and falls or is cut down, another tree in no hard-pressed thereby. & # 8217 ; . . . he felt no contentment, he obtained no alleviation, like a king of beasts pierced profoundly in the bosom by a poisoned pointer. ( 555 )

Contentment and quiet credence are the biggest obstruction to action. To make nil brings no felicity to anyone ; therefore anxiousness and heartache are indispensable in impeling the prince towards seeking personal fulfilment in this universe. Although he realizes that some facts of life are so inevitable, he remains unable to merely accept the universe as it is:

A deplorable thing it is so that, who is himself incapacitated and capable to the jurisprudence of old age, disease and devastation, should in his ignorance and the sightlessness of his amour propre, pay no attentiveness to another who is the victim of old age, disease or decease. For if I, who am myself such, should pay no attentiveness to another whose nature is every bit such, it would non be right or suiting in me, who have knowledge of this, the ultimate Torahs.

He can ne’er once more softly retreat to the undisturbed comfort, peace and luxury of the castle. In fact, his new experiences and penetration into world alteration his very definition of & # 8220 ; comfort & # 8221 ; and & # 8220 ; peace & # 8221 ; and he sets out to happen felicity through religious fulfilment and leaves the castle.

In conformity with Confucius & # 8217 ; statement, the prince, like H2O, could non be held and confined indefinitely. Once on the move, he kept traveling off from the castle, like the H2O with its watercourse irreversible. The more he knew, the more he wanted to cognize, and the lupus erythematosus he understood. His quest for cognition led him out of the soundlessness of the castle and his deep thrust to seek replies and alterations sent him off in chase of his felicity.

Judit Bodor

ENG. 2653

World Lit. I.

Wisdom

Confucius said: & # 8221 ; The knowing enjoy H2O, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent ; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived. & # 8221 ; ( 611 ) Water is critical to existence and is traveling streaming and fluxing off from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, nevertheless olympian, remain stationary everlastingly. To cognize and to cognize more 1 must travel and larn. Knowledge besides expands appetency for more cognition therefore the 1s who know, will diligently work to cognize more and to break the universe alternatively of softly accepting it. Happiness is measured in tallness, non in length ; it is straight related to the grade of personal fulfilment that one is able to make, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius & # 8217 ; averment is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha & # 8217 ; s & # 8220 ; Buddhacarita & # 8221 ; . In the transition the bright immature princess is kept shielded from all negative facets of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the castle, he realizes he had been kept from cognizing life itself. He becomes even more funny, relentless and willing to move alternatively of accepting, and, eventually, he sets out in hunt of felicity through religious enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momently and partly arrested, is impossible to restrict. Just like immature Shakyamuni, it can non be held confined, it can non be kept from traveling to topographic points. It will finally claim its infinite and demand its freedom:

The sovereign, reflecting that the prince must see nil untoward that might foment his head, assigned him a home in the upper floor of the castle and did non let him to entree the land. . . . The hearing of the capturing character of the metropolis Grovess, beloved of the womenfolk, he set his bosom on an expedition outside, like an elephant confined inside a house. ( 550 )

As H2O moves off from the mountains, the prince begins his journey that will finally take him off from the castle and impel him towards detecting the universe for himself.

With each jaunt his wonder grows and each clip be becomes more and more compelled to larn about the existent universe and to do a difference. The quotation mark provinces, & # 8220 ; The knowing are diligent ; the humane are quiet. & # 8221 ; ( 611 ) Prince Shakyamuni absolutely mirrors the passage between soundlessness and diligence as cognition about the existent universe penetrates his boundaries:

Then the prince returned to the same castle, but so lost in anxiousness that is seemed to him empty. But even there he found no alleviation, as he of all time dwelt on the topic of old age ; hence once more with the permission of the male monarch he went out? ( 553 )

Although the things he learns about the existent universe do non strike him positively, larning itself necessarily induces a craving to larn more, which, ironically adequate diminishes his apprehension of the universe:

Therefore, charioteer, allow our chariot be turned back ; for it is non the clip or topographic point for pleasure-resorts. For how could a adult male of intelligence be heedless here in the hr of catastrophe, when one time he knows of devastation? ( 554 )

Knowing and larning topographic point him in a province of pandemonium, and merely go forth him with more inquiries. He becomes dying and overwhelmed by the find of the existent universe. He finds the universe to be nescient, insensitive and displeasing, and he finds it impossible to believe it to be acceptable in its current province:

He, the supreme adult male, saw that T

hey had no house picking in the existent truth, and with head that was at the same clip both perturbed and steadfast he therefore mediated: – ‘ ? what rational being would stand or sit or lie at easiness, still less laugh, when he knows of old age, disease and decease? . . . . he is merely like a being without ground, who, on seeing another aged or ill or even dead, remains apathetic and unaffected. For when one tree is sheared both of its flowers and its fruit and falls or is cut down, another tree in no hard-pressed thereby.’ . . . he felt no contentment, he obtained no alleviation, like a king of beasts pierced profoundly in the bosom by a poisoned pointer. ( 555 )

Contentment and quiet credence are the biggest obstruction to action. To make nil brings no felicity to anyone ; therefore anxiousness and heartache are indispensable in impeling the prince towards seeking personal fulfilment in this universe. Although he realizes that some facts of life are so inevitable, he remains unable to merely accept the universe as it is:

A deplorable thing it is so that, who is himself incapacitated and capable to the jurisprudence of old age, disease and devastation, should in his ignorance and the sightlessness of his amour propre, pay no attentiveness to another who is the victim of old age, disease or decease. For if I, who am myself such, should pay no attentiveness to another whose nature is every bit such, it would non be right or suiting in me, who have knowledge of this, the ultimate Torahs.

He can ne’er once more softly retreat to the undisturbed comfort, peace and luxury of the castle. In fact, his new experiences and penetration into world alteration his very definition of & # 8220 ; comfort & # 8221 ; and & # 8220 ; peace & # 8221 ; and he sets out to happen felicity through religious fulfilment and leaves the castle.

In conformity with Confucius & # 8217 ; statement, the prince, like H2O, could non be held and confined indefinitely. Once on the move, he kept traveling off from the castle, like the H2O with its watercourse irreversible. The more he knew, the more he wanted to cognize, and the lupus erythematosus he understood. His quest for cognition led him out of the soundlessness of the castle and his deep thrust to seek replies and alterations sent him off in chase of his felicity.

Judit Bodor

ENG. 2653

World Lit. I.

Wisdom

Confucius said: & # 8221 ; The knowing enjoy H2O, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent ; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived. & # 8221 ; ( 611 ) Water is critical to existence and is traveling streaming and fluxing off from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, nevertheless olympian, remain stationary everlastingly. To cognize and to cognize more 1 must travel and larn. Knowledge besides expands appetency for more cognition therefore the 1s who know, will diligently work to cognize more and to break the universe alternatively of softly accepting it. Happiness is measured in tallness, non in length ; it is straight related to the grade of personal fulfilment that one is able to make, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius & # 8217 ; averment is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha & # 8217 ; s & # 8220 ; Buddhacarita & # 8221 ; . In the transition the bright immature princess is kept shielded from all negative facets of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the castle, he realizes he had been kept from cognizing life itself. He becomes even more funny, relentless and willing to move alternatively of accepting, and, eventually, he sets out in hunt of felicity through religious enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momently and partly arrested, is impossible to restrict. Just like immature Shakyamuni, it can non be held confined, it can non be kept from traveling to topographic points. It will finally claim its infinite and demand its freedom:

The sovereign, reflecting that the prince must see nil untoward that might foment his head, assigned him a home in the upper floor of the castle and did non let him to entree the land. . . . The hearing of the capturing character of the metropolis Grovess, beloved of the womenfolk, he set his bosom on an expedition outside, like an elephant confined inside a house. ( 550 )

As H2O moves off from the mountains, the prince begins his journey that will finally take him off from the castle and impel him towards detecting the universe for himself.

With each jaunt his wonder grows and each clip be becomes more and more compelled to larn about the existent universe and to do a difference. The quotation mark provinces, & # 8220 ; The knowing are diligent ; the humane are quiet. & # 8221 ; ( 611 ) Prince Shakyamuni absolutely mirrors the passage between soundlessness and diligence as cognition about the existent universe penetrates his boundaries:

Then the prince returned to the same castle, but so lost in anxiousness that is seemed to him empty. But even there he found no alleviation, as he of all time dwelt on the topic of old age ; hence once more with the permission of the male monarch he went out? ( 553 )

Although the things he learns about the existent universe do non strike him positively, larning itself necessarily induces a craving to larn more, which, ironically adequate diminishes his apprehension of the universe:

Therefore, charioteer, allow our chariot be turned back ; for it is non the clip or topographic point for pleasure-resorts. For how could a adult male of intelligence be heedless here in the hr of catastrophe, when one time he knows of devastation? ( 554 )

Knowing and larning topographic point him in a province of pandemonium, and merely go forth him with more inquiries. He becomes dying and overwhelmed by the find of the existent universe. He finds the universe to be nescient, insensitive and displeasing, and he finds it impossible to believe it to be acceptable in its current province:

He, the supreme adult male, saw that they had no house picking in the existent truth, and with head that was at the same clip both perturbed and steadfast he therefore mediated: – & # 8216 ; ? what rational being would stand or sit or lie at easiness, still less laugh, when he knows of old age, disease and decease? . . . . he is merely like a being without ground, who, on seeing another aged or ill or even dead, remains apathetic and unaffected. For when one tree is sheared both of its flowers and its fruit and falls or is cut down, another tree in no hard-pressed thereby. & # 8217 ; . . . he felt no contentment, he obtained no alleviation, like a king of beasts pierced profoundly in the bosom by a poisoned pointer. ( 555 )

Contentment and quiet credence are the biggest obstruction to action. To make nil brings no felicity to anyone ; therefore anxiousness and heartache are indispensable in impeling the prince towards seeking personal fulfilment in this universe. Although he realizes that some facts of life are so inevitable, he remains unable to merely accept the universe as it is:

A deplorable thing it is so that, who is himself incapacitated and capable to the jurisprudence of old age, disease and devastation, should in his ignorance and the sightlessness of his amour propre, pay no attentiveness to another who is the victim of old age, disease or decease. For if I, who am myself such, should pay no attentiveness to another whose nature is every bit such, it would non be right or suiting in me, who have knowledge of this, the ultimate Torahs.

He can ne’er once more softly retreat to the undisturbed comfort, peace and luxury of the castle. In fact, his new experiences and penetration into world alteration his very definition of & # 8220 ; comfort & # 8221 ; and & # 8220 ; peace & # 8221 ; and he sets out to happen felicity through religious fulfilment and leaves the castle.

In conformity with Confucius & # 8217 ; statement, the prince, like H2O, could non be held and confined indefinitely. Once on the move, he kept traveling off from the castle, like the H2O with its watercourse irreversible. The more he knew, the more he wanted to cognize, and the lupus erythematosus he understood. His quest for cognition led him out of the soundlessness of the castle and his deep thrust to seek replies and alterations sent him off in chase of his felicity.

Judit Bodor

ENG. 2653

World Lit. I.

Wisdom

Confucius said: & # 8221 ; The knowing enjoy H2O, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent ; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived. & # 8221 ; ( 611 ) Water is critical to existence and is traveling streaming and fluxing off from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, nevertheless olympian, remain stationary everlastingly. To cognize and to cognize more 1 must travel and larn. Knowledge besides expands appetency for more cognition therefore the 1s who know, will diligently work to cognize more and to break the universe alternatively of softly accepting it. Happiness is measured in tallness, non in length ; it is straight related to the grade of personal fulfilment that one is able to make, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius & # 8217 ; averment is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha & # 8217 ; s & # 8220 ; Buddhacarita & # 8221 ; . In the transition the bright immature princess is kept shielded from all negative facets of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the castle, he realizes he had been kept from cognizing life itself. He becomes even more funny, relentless and willing to move alternatively of accepting, and, eventually, he sets out in hunt of felicity through religious enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momently and partly arrested, is impossible to restrict. Just like immature Shakyamuni, it can non be held confined, it can non be kept from traveling to topographic points. It will finally claim its infinite and demand its freedom:

The sovereign, reflecting that the prince must see nil untoward that might foment his head, assigned him a home in the upper floor of the castle and did non let him to entree the land. . . . The hearing of the capturing character of the metropolis Grovess, beloved of the womenfolk, he set his bosom on an expedition outside, like an elephant confined inside a house. ( 550 )

As H2O moves off from the mountains, the prince begins his journey that will finally take him off from the castle and impel him towards detecting the universe for himself.

With each jaunt his wonder grows and each clip be becomes more and more compelled to larn about the existent universe and to do a difference. The quotation mark provinces, & # 8220 ; The knowing are diligent ; the humane are quiet. & # 8221 ; ( 611 ) Prince Shakyamuni absolutely mirrors the passage between soundlessness and diligence as cognition about the existent universe penetrates his boundaries:

Then the prince returned to the same castle, but so lost in anxiousness that is seemed to him empty. But even there he found no alleviation, as he of all time dwelt on the topic of old age ; hence once more with the permission of the male monarch he went out? ( 553 )

Although the things he learns about the existent universe do non strike him positively, larning itself necessarily induces a craving to larn more, which, ironically adequate diminishes his apprehension of the universe:

Therefore, charioteer, allow our chariot be turned back ; for it is non the clip or topographic point for pleasure-resorts. For how could a adult male of intelligence be heedless here in the hr of catastrophe, when one time he knows of devastation? ( 554 )

Knowing and larning topographic point him in a province of pandemonium, and merely go forth him with more inquiries. He becomes dying and overwhelmed by the find of the existent universe. He finds the universe to be nescient, insensitive and displeasing, and he finds it impossible to believe it to be acceptable in its current province:

He, the supreme adult male, saw that they had no house picking in the existent truth, and with head that was at the same clip both perturbed and steadfast he therefore mediated: – & # 8216 ; ? what rational being would stand or sit or lie at easiness, still less laugh, when he knows of old age, disease and decease? . . . . he is merely like a being without ground, who, on seeing another aged or ill or even dead, remains apathetic and unaffected. For when one tree is sheared both of its flowers and its fruit and falls or is cut down, another tree in no hard-pressed thereby. & # 8217 ; . . . he felt no contentment, he obtained no alleviation, like a king of beasts pierced profoundly in the bosom by a poisoned pointer. ( 555 )

Contentment and quiet credence are the biggest obstruction to action. To make nil brings no felicity to anyone ; therefore anxiousness and heartache are indispensable in impeling the prince towards seeking personal fulfilment in this universe. Although he realizes that some facts of life are so inevitable, he remains unable to merely accept the universe as it is:

A deplorable thing it is so that, who is himself incapacitated and capable to the jurisprudence of old age, disease and devastation, should in his ignorance and the sightlessness of his amour propre, pay no attentiveness to another who is the victim of old age, disease or decease. For if I, who am myself such, should pay no attentiveness to another whose nature is every bit such, it would non be right or suiting in me, who have knowledge of this, the ultimate Torahs.

He can ne’er once more softly retreat to the undisturbed comfort, peace and luxury of the castle. In fact, his new experiences and penetration into world alteration his very definition of & # 8220 ; comfort & # 8221 ; and & # 8220 ; peace & # 8221 ; and he sets out to happen felicity through religious fulfilment and leaves the castle.

In conformity with Confucius & # 8217 ; statement, the prince, like H2O, could non be held and confined indefinitely. Once on the move, he kept traveling off from the castle, like the H2O with its watercourse irreversible. The more he knew, the more he wanted to cognize, and the lupus erythematosus he understood. His quest for cognition led him out of the soundlessness of the castle and his deep thrust to seek replies and alterations sent him off in chase of his felicity.

Judit Bodor

ENG. 2653

World Lit. I.

Wisdom

Confucius said: & # 8221 ; The knowing enjoy H2O, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent ; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived. & # 8221 ; ( 611 ) Water is critical to existence and is traveling streaming and fluxing off from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, nevertheless olympian, remain stationary everlastingly. To cognize and to cognize more 1 must travel and larn. Knowledge besides expands appetency for more cognition therefore the 1s who know, will diligently work to cognize more and to break the universe alternatively of softly accepting it. Happiness is measured in tallness, non in length ; it is straight related to the grade of personal fulfilment that one is able to make, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius & # 8217 ; averment is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha & # 8217 ; s & # 8220 ; Buddhacarita & # 8221 ; . In the transition the bright immature princess is kept shielded from all negative facets of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the castle, he realizes he had been kept from cognizing life itself. He becomes even more funny, relentless and willing to move alternatively of accepting, and, eventually, he sets out in hunt of felicity through religious enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momently and partly arrested, is impossible to confin